For Better Health – Tips and Awareness

orig drinking soda vs sugar image

Increasing Access to Healthy Drinks and Reducing Access to Sugary Drinks

Why Focus on Beverages?
Communities Putting Prevention to Work Grant Focuses on Healthy Beverages
Community Transformation Grant Focuses on Four Strategic Directions Including Sugary Drinks
CA Project LEAN Blog: California’s Sugary Drink Tax Proposal Has Not Yet Fizzled
Public Health Institute’s Beverage Standards
22 Packets of Sugar – Rethink Your Drink Fact Sheets (English/Spanish)
Case Studies: Eliminating Electrolyte Replacement Beverages in California Public Schools
Water in Schools

For more information about this project, contact Cyndi Walter at Cyndi.Walter@cdph.ca.gov or (916) 552.9980.

Why Focus on Beverages?
Sugary drinks are the single largest source of calories in the American diet. Greater sugary beverage consumption is associated with weight gain, obesity, and diabetes. The average person in the U.S. drank 45 gallons of sugary drinks in 2009. Increasing access to more healthful beverages is important for reducing sugary drink consumption.

Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption is highest among groups that are at greatest risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes. In California, 62 percent of adolescents ages 12-17 and 41 percent of children ages 2-11 drink at least one soda or other sweetened beverage every day. For children who daily drink one or more sugary beverages have a 55% increased chance of being overweight or obese. The prevalence of overweight and obesity is higher among California adolescents who drink sugar-sweetened beverages than those who don’t.

While traditional carbonated drinks such as soda are losing market share, beverages like sports drinks, energy drinks, and sweetened waters and teas are showing significant growth in the marketplace. In a 2008 representative sample of public high schools in California, 8 of the 10 top beverages offered for sale in California schools were sugar-added electrolyte replacement beverages.

Communities Putting Prevention to Work Grant Focuses on Healthy Beverages
In February of 2010, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) secured a two-year Communities Putting Prevention to Work (CPPW) grant from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) to address obesity prevention. California Project LEAN served as the lead on this grant for the nutrition initiative, which focused on increasing access to healthy beverages and limiting access to sugary drinks. For more information, see http://www.californiaprojectlean.org/docuserfiles//SSB%20Project%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf

Community Transformation Grant Focuses on Four Strategic Directions Including Sugary Drinks
CA4Health – Bringing Community Transformation to Life in Rural California

CA Project LEAN Blog: California’s Sugary Drink Tax Proposal Has Not Yet Fizzled
http://www.phi.org/news-events/483/californias-sugary-drink-tax-proposal-has-not-yet-fizzled

Public Health Institute’s Beverage Standards

Children 0-5 years of Age
Non-school Youth Settings
Schools
Adults

22 Packets of Sugar – ReThink Your Drink Factsheets (English/Spanish)

Case Studies
Highlights from Califonia school districts where electrolyte replacement beverages were replaced with water.
Earlimart School District – Eliminating Electrolyte Replacement Beverages
Eliminating Electrolyte Replacement Beverages in California Public Schools
http://californiaprojectlean.org/doc.asp?id=225

 

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